Learn About US Marshal Careers

The US Marshals Service is a federal police and law enforcement agency within the United States Department of Justice. The primary goal of the US Marshals Service is to hunt down and capture fugitives. The US Marshal Service captures more federal fugitives a year than all other national law enforcement agencies combined.

Requirements for a US Marshal

To become a US marshal, you must be between the ages of 21 and 36, have a 4-year college degree (Bachelor's Degree) or three years of qualifying experience, have a driver's license and a good driving record, be in excellent physical condition, and pass an in-depth background investigation. Once accepted, new agents must attend a 10-week program at the US Marshals Training Center in Glynco, GA.

Find Schools Offering Criminal Justice and US Marshal-related Degree Programs

Having a combination of education and experience, especially an advanced degree like a graduate degree in law (Master's in Law and Legal Studies Programs) or a field related to law enforcement like criminal justice (Master's in Criminal Justice Programs), may help you find employment.

In a hurry? Request free information from select online Criminal Justice and related 4-year degree programs.

US Marshals Service Salary

Now that you know how to become a US Marshal, you'll want to know how much you can earn. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics' 2014-15 Occupational Outlook Handbook, the median national annual salary for police and detectives, including local and federal officers and marshals, is $56,980. Actual salaries may vary greatly based on specialization within the field, location, years of experience and a variety of other factors. National long-term projections of employment growth may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth.

The job outlook for US Marshals Service Agents is projected to grow about as fast as the average job, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. This growth can be attributed to a more security-conscious society. US Marshals' jobs are competitive and all applicants should do as much as possible to set themselves apart from other applicants. An advanced degree and prior law enforcement experience may help.

The US Marshals Service selection process can take anywhere from six months to three years, so apply for jobs early. The schools below have the type of 4-year college degree programs that you'll need. Request information from the schools that suit you best and start your degree today!

Sources: www.usmarshals.gov, www.bls.gov

California Criminal Justice Schools

Campuses: Reseda, Gardena, Santa Ana, La Puente

Degrees Offered:

  • Diploma - Criminal Justice - Private & Homeland Security

Missouri Criminal Justice Schools

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Campuses: Kansas City

Degrees Offered:

  • Diploma - Criminal Justice - Private & Homeland Security

Florida Criminal Justice Schools

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Campuses: Orlando

Degrees Offered:

  • Diploma - Criminal Justice - Private & Homeland Security

Online Criminal Justice Schools

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Campuses: Online

Degrees Offered:

  • BSCJ - Law Enforcement
  • MSCJ - Law

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Campuses: Online

Degrees Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts - Law Enforcement Administration (Online)

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Campuses: Online

Degrees Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science - Public Administration: Law Enforcement

Minnesota Criminal Justice Schools

Campuses: Lake Elmo, Bloomington, St. Cloud, Eagan, Mankato, Brooklyn Park, Moorhead

Degrees Offered:

  • Certificate - Law Enforcement Academics
  • Certificate - Law Enforcement Skills
  • Associate's - Law Enforcement

Ontario Criminal Justice Schools

Campuses: Kingston, Burlington, Peterborough, St. Catharines, Oshawa

Degrees Offered:

  • Diploma in Police Foundations

British Columbia Criminal Justice Schools

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Campuses: Surrey

Degrees Offered:

  • Diploma - Law Enforcement Foundations

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Program outcomes vary according to each institution's specific curriculum and employment opportunities are not guaranteed.
Earning a degree may not qualify you for specialized careers that require more education or experience in the field.